What do you want to be when you grow up? A doctor, teacher, astronaut? How about a FLOgrammer like Trent Bourgeois? Bring Your Kids to Work Day is a great opportunity to have your son or daughter explore potential career paths. We sat down with Trent Bourgeois, Business Intelligence Manager at Patten Seed, his son Winston (11 years old) and Winston’s friend William Rodriguez (10 years old) to explore a FLO they built, the lessons they learned when using Azuqua, and how you can use Azuqua in your own life.
Trent says, “I was excited to show them some of the things I do, and since I was eating, breathing, sleeping Azuqua, I thought this would be a great tool to show them and maybe that can be applied to something they’re learning in school or interest them in something for the future.”

It turns out that Azuqua can be applied to what the kids are learning in school, both game development and Lego Robotics. Winston and William have experience with programming on tools such as Tinker, Scratch, and Lego Mindstorms, which it turned out made them more than ready to become ace Azuqua FLOgrammers.

First Impressions of Azuqua

When first getting into the tool, Trent showed them the basics like what a card is and what actions and events are. Winston and William quickly caught on and before they knew it they were diving into advanced features like Child FLOs and tables.

Winston says, “It was interesting to me because it was like coding, and I like to code games. When I saw that Azuqua had the same type of blocks and movements it really interested me. I thought if I enjoy coding, I might enjoy using this program.”

William had a different perspective. He participated in Lego Robotics where he saw similarities between Azuqua and Lego Mindstorms. William says, “It was very similar where the Parent FLO was the brain of the robot that we had to program using different blocks and forward and backward commands.”

The Project

To get started, Winston and William had a table filled with rows of sales data.

The goal was to assign a sales rep to a region based on the subcategory (furniture, technology, and office supplies). The problem was that there were four regions and only three sales reps, so if it was ordered from the leftover region who would get the profit?

Winston states, “We programmed it to give every row an order and pluck out the sales to see who had the best sales record out of us, and then we needed to set a process to assign the rows to an owner.”

They decided to break the problem up into a Parent FLO and a Child FLO. Winston says, “The Parent FLO is the brain and tells the Child FLO what to do, so the first step was we had to search the rows which gathered data from the table so then it could process each row of data with the Child FLO.”

The next step was to set up the Child FLO. What this FLO did was bring over the Row ID and associate it with the correct Row. In order to associate the owner of each sale, the program would use If logic, so as if to say, “If East region and a subcategory of furniture, assign to this sales rep.”
The next step was to set up the Child FLO. What this FLO did was bring over the Row ID and associate it with the correct Row. In order to associate the owner of each sale, the program would use If logic, so as if to say, “If East region and a subcategory of furniture, assign to this sales rep.”

The final step was the program would compose an email and send out to the boss so that the boss could see who has the best sales in the company.

Including testing and mapping, it took Winston and William, with some help from Trent, four hours to build the FLO. Not bad for their first time building a FLO.

Second Impressions of Azuqua

“It’s fun! I enjoyed the fact that we programmed it, and when it worked successfully you were able to learn and have experiences with the program. Also, being able to see the data pass through was exciting.” – Winston

“It was satisfying once you get everything together and see it work. You really get a satisfying feeling like hey, I did this.” – William

“Azuqua is a little harder than Lego Robotics because it has more options than in Lego Robotics because each block has different inputs.. Lego robotics was just the beginning and this has the chance to really open it up.” – Winston

How Do You See the Tool Fit in a Business Setting?

We asked Winston and William how this tool could be incorporated into their own life and they said:

“Any company that deals with large amounts of items and needs organization would be able to use this. Let’s say we have a car company or food industry we can organize the owner of these foods with all these categories or what car would be making the most money.” – Winston

“I would use it for automation, not having to go and manually change everything and instead have the program create lists or categories.”  – William

Valuable Lessons They Learned

“You can never get better if you don’t try. Just because it doesn’t work the first time doesn’t mean it won’t work.” – William

They also made great suggestions such as building your FLO out on a whiteboard, test every step of the way, and this tool and process gets you thinking about what could happen and how to prepare for it.

What the Teachers Thought

The teachers thought what Winston and William did was truly amazing…and we agree! This was an extremely impressive FLO and would’ve been inspiring to see them in action.

Want to Listen to Them?

To hear from Trent, Winston, and William themselves, check out our podcast with them, “Automation is Child’s play”. And to have as much fun building in Azuqua as Trent, William and Winston do, go here to start your free trial!